All the King’s Men

King's men

Wednesday 07/08/20 

Series: Thru the Bible

Message – All the King’s Men

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Thru the Bible: 2 Samuel 5; 23:8-39; 1Chron. 11-12

2 Samuel 5 

David anointed King of Israel

“(1) All the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron and said, “Here we are, your own flesh and blood.  (2)  Even while Saul was king over us, you were the one who led us out to battle and brought us back. The LORD also said to you, ‘You will shepherd My people Israel and be ruler over Israel.'”  

“(3)  So all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron. King David made a covenant with them at Hebron in the LORD’s presence, and they anointed David king over Israel.  (4)  David was 30 years old when he began his reign; he reigned 40 years.”  

“(5)  In Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six months, and in Jerusalem he reigned 33 years over all Israel and Judah.”

“(6)  The king and his men marched to Jerusalem against the Jebusites who inhabited the land.” 

“The Jebusites had said to David: “You will never get in here. Even the blind and lame can repel you,” thinking, “David can’t get in here.”  (7)  Yet David did capture the stronghold of Zion, the city of David.  (8)  He said that day, “Whoever attacks the Jebusites must go through the water shaft to reach the lame and the blind who are despised by David.” 

For this reason it is said, “The blind and the lame will never enter the house.”  

“(9)  David took up residence in the stronghold, which he named the city of David. He built it up all the way around from the supporting terraces inward.  (10)  David became more and more powerful, and the LORD God of Hosts was with him.”  

“(11)  King Hiram of Tyre sent envoys to David; he also sent cedar logs, carpenters, and stonemasons, and they built a palace for David.  (12)  Then David knew that the LORD had established him as king over Israel and had exalted his kingdom for the sake of His people Israel.” 

“(13)  After he arrived from Hebron, David took more concubines and wives in Jerusalem, and more sons and daughters were born to him.  (14)  These are the names of those born to him in Jerusalem: Shammua, Shobab, Nathan, Solomon,  (15)  Ibhar, Elishua, Nepheg, Japhia,  (16)  Elishama, Eliada, and Eliphelet.”

There are a few things of note in this chapter so far.

The call and anointing of God distinguishes a person before others. This does NOT always have a positive effect, but when God places His anointing on person, delegates authority to them and influences them with a revelation of Himself…it causes them to stand out and spiritually it makes them both a light and a target. We need look no further than Jesus Himself, Who had NOTHING the Jews were actually looking for “No beauty that we should desire Him” yet, nevertheless, may came to Him at the height of His ministry yet, nearly all forsook Him at the end. Also consider the prophets of whom Stephen asked the rhetorical question, “Which of the prophets did your fathers not persecute? They even killed those who announced beforehand the coming of the Righteous One…etc.”

So the call, anointing, grace and delegated influence of God distinguishes a person for the work they are called to, which may or may not be received, desired or heeded.

I am reminded of another passage we took out of context for years which implies something which both is and isn’t true. It is found in Prov. 18:16. In the NKJV it reads, “A man’s gift makes room for him, And brings him before great men.” This does NOT mean that a person’s spiritual gift makes room for them and brings them before great men. For every example where one could claim this is true, there are countless thousands of people who have anointings, callings and gifts from God which have not and never will bring them before Great men. No, the passage means that a person bearing or bringing gifts opens doors for them and even can cause them to stand before kings. Many people of old gained audience with Kings by bringing gifts of gold, rare and costly clothing and jewels – an audience which they would surely have been denied had they come empty handed.

Also, in this passage there is a connection made between a shepherd and a ruler, one which is picked up on and continued in the New Testament regarding Pastors. There are many names for a pastor in the New Testament but shepherd and ruler are among them.

Heb 13:17, “Obey those who rule over you, and be submissive, for they watch out for your souls, as those who must give account. Let them do so with joy and not with grief, for that would be unprofitable for you.”

Also of note are the names of David’s children. Much can be ascertained of a person’s heart and inclinations based upon the names they give to their children.

  • Shammua – Renowned
  • Shobab – Rebellious (Son of Bathsheba)
  • Nathan – Giver
  • Solomon – Peace
  • Ibhar – Jehovah Chooses
  • Elishua – My God IS wealth OR God is Salvation
  • Nepheg – Sprout
  • Japhia – Bright or shining
  • Elishama – My God has heard
  • Eliada – God knows
  • and Eliphelet – God is deliverance

1 Chronicles 11:1-9  

“(1) All Israel came together to David at Hebron and said, “Here we are, your own flesh and blood.  (2)  Even when Saul was king, you led us out to battle and brought us back. The LORD your God also said to you, ‘You will shepherd My people Israel and be ruler over My people Israel.'”  (3)  So all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron. David made a covenant with them at Hebron in the LORD’s presence, and they anointed David king over Israel, in keeping with the LORD’s word through Samuel.”

David Takes Jerusalem

“(4)  David and all Israel marched to Jerusalem (that is, Jebus); the Jebusites who inhabited the land were there.  (5)  The inhabitants of Jebus said to David, “You will never get in here.” Yet David did capture the stronghold of Zion (that is, the city of David).  (6)  David said, “Whoever is the first to kill a Jebusite will become commander-in-chief.” Joab son of Zeruiah went up first, so he became the chief.  (7)  Then David took up residence in the stronghold; therefore, it was called the city of David.  (8)  He built up the city all the way around, from the supporting terraces to the surrounding parts, and Joab restored the rest of the city.  (9)  David steadily grew more powerful, and the LORD of Hosts was with him.”

David Defeats the Philistines

“(17)  When the Philistines heard that David had been anointed king over Israel, they all went in search of David, but he heard about it and went down to the stronghold.”

“(18)  So the Philistines came and spread out in the Valley of Rephaim.  

(19)  Then David inquired of the LORD: “Should I go to war against the Philistines? Will you hand them over to me?” 

The LORD replied to David, “Go, for I will certainly hand the Philistines over to you.”  

(20)  So David went to Baal-perazim and defeated them there and said, “Like a bursting flood, the LORD has burst out against my enemies before me.” Therefore, he named that place the Lord Bursts Out.  

(21)  The Philistines abandoned their idols there, and David and his men carried them off.  

(22)  The Philistines came up again and spread out in the Valley of Rephaim.  

(23)  So David inquired of the LORD, and He answered, “Do not make a frontal assault. Circle around behind them and attack them opposite the balsam trees.  (24)  When you hear the sound of marching in the tops of the balsam trees, act decisively, for then the LORD will have marched out ahead of you to attack the camp of the Philistines.”  

(25)  So David did exactly as the LORD commanded him, and he struck down the Philistines all the way from Geba to Gezer.”

This is a noteworthy characteristic of David and one we need to be careful to emulate. David, in most cases, consulted God before making national decisions. I want you to notice however, that David did not act on presumption either. God had told him the first time to go ahead and attack the Philistines, but he did not assume that this was still God’s command the second time they presented themselves for war. David asked again and it was a good thing too – For though God’s answer had not changed, THIS time came with specific instructions which if not followed would almost certainly have yielded a different outcome.

2 Samuel 23:8-39,

David’s Mighty Men

“(8)These are the names of David’s warriors: Josheb-bas-shebeth the Tahche-monite was chief of the officers. He wielded his spear against 800 men he killed at one time.  

(9)  After him, Eleazar son of Dodo son of Ahohi was among the three warriors with David when they defied the Philistines. The men of Israel retreated in the place they had gathered for battle,  (10)  but Eleazar stood his ground and attacked the Philistines until his hand was tired and stuck to his sword. The LORD brought about a great victory that day. Then the troops came back to him, but only to plunder the dead.  

(11)  After him was Shammah son of Agee the Hararite. The Philistines had assembled in formation where there was a field full of lentils. The troops fled from the Philistines,  (12)  but Shammah took his stand in the middle of the field, defended it, and struck down the Philistines. So the LORD brought about a great victory.  

(13)  Three of the 30 leading warriors went down at harvest time and came to David at the cave of Adullam, while a company of Philistines was camping in the Valley of Rephaim.  (14)  At that time David was in the stronghold, and a Philistine garrison was at Bethlehem.  (15)  David was extremely thirsty and said, “If only someone would bring me water to drink from the well at the city gate of Bethlehem!”  (16)  So three of the warriors broke through the Philistine camp and drew water from the well at the gate of Bethlehem. They brought it back to David, but he refused to drink it. Instead, he poured it out to the LORD.  (17)  David said, “LORD, I would never do such a thing! Is this not the blood of men who risked their lives?” So he refused to drink it. Such were the exploits of the three warriors.  

(18)  Abishai, Joab’s brother and son of Zeruiah, was leader of the Three. He raised his spear against 300 men and killed them, gaining a reputation among the Three.  (19)  Was he not the most honored of the Three? He became their commander even though he did not become one of the Three.  

(20)  Bena-iah son of Jehoi-ada was the son of a brave man from Kabzeel, a man of many exploits. Benaiah killed two sons of Ariel of Moab, and he went down into a pit on a snowy day and killed a lion.  (21)  He also killed an Egyptian, a huge man. Even though the Egyptian had a spear in his hand, Benaiah went down to him with a club, snatched the spear out of the Egyptian’s hand, and then killed him with his own spear.  (22)  These were the exploits of Benaiah son of Jehoiada, who had a reputation among the three warriors.  (23)  He was the most honored of the Thirty, but he did not become one of the Three. David put him in charge of his bodyguard.  (24)  Among the Thirty were: Joab’s brother Asahel, Elhanan son of Dodo of Bethlehem,  (25)  Shammah the Harodite, Elika the Harodite,  (26)  Helez the Paltite, Ira son of Ikkesh the Tekoite,  (27)  Abiezer the Anathothite, Mebunnai the Hushathite,  (28)  Zalmon the Ahohite, Maharai the Netophathite,  (29)  Heleb son of Baanah the Netophahite, Ittai son of Ribai from Gibeah of the Benjaminites,  (30)  Benaiah the Pirathonite, Hiddai from the Wadis of Gaash,  (31)  Abi-albon the Arbathite, Azmaveth the Barhumite,  (32)  Eliahba the Shaalbonite, the sons of Jashen, Jonathan son of  (33)  Shammah the Hararite,Ahiam son of Sharar the Hararite,  (34)  Eliphelet son of Ahasbai son of the Maacathite, Eliam son of Ahithophel the Gilonite,  (35)  Hezro the Carmelite, Paarai the Arbite,  (36)  Igal son of Nathan from Zobah, Bani the Gadite,  (37)  Zelek the Ammonite, Naharai the Beerothite, the armor-bearer for Joab son of Zeruiah,  (38)  Ira the Ithrite, Gareb the Ithrite,  (39)  and Uriah the Hittite. There were 37 in all.”

1 Chronicles 11:10-47,  

“(10) The following were the chiefs of David’s warriors who, together with all Israel, strongly supported him in his reign to make him king according to the LORD’s word about Israel.  (11)  This is the list of David’s warriors: Jashobeam son of Hachmoni was chief of the Thirty; he wielded his spear against 300 and killed them at one time.  (12)  After him, Eleazar son of Dodo the Ahohite was one of the three warriors.  (13)  He was with David at Pas-dammim when the Philistines had gathered there for battle. A plot of ground full of barley was there, where the troops had fled from the Philistines.  (14)  But Eleazar and David took their stand in the middle of the plot and defended it. They killed the Philistines, and the LORD gave them a great victory.  (15)  Three of the 30 chief men went down to David, to the rock at the cave of Adullam, while the Philistine army was encamped in the Valley of Rephaim.  (16)  At that time David was in the stronghold, and a Philistine garrison was at Bethlehem.  (17)  David was extremely thirsty and said, “If only someone would bring me water from the well at the city gate of Bethlehem!”  (18)  So the Three broke through the Philistine camp and drew water from the well at the gate of Bethlehem. They brought it back to David, but he refused to drink it. Instead, he poured it out to the LORD.  (19)  David said, “I would never do such a thing in the presence of God! How can I drink the blood of these men who risked their lives?” For they brought it at the risk of their lives. So he would not drink it. Such were the exploits of the three warriors.  (20)  Abishai, Joab’s brother, was the leader of the Three. He raised his spear against 300 men and killed them, gaining a reputation among the Three.  (21)  He was the most honored of the Three and became their commander even though he did not become one of the Three.  (22)  Benaiah son of Jehoiada was the son of a brave man from Kabzeel, a man of many exploits. Benaiah killed two sons of Ariel of Moab, and he went down into a pit on a snowy day and killed a lion.  (23)  He also killed an Egyptian who was seven and a half feet tall. Even though the Egyptian had a spear in his hand like a weaver’s beam, Benaiah went down to him with a club, snatched the spear out of the Egyptian’s hand, and then killed him with his own spear.  (24)  These were the exploits of Benaiah son of Jehoiada, who had a reputation among the three warriors.  (25)  He was the most honored of the Thirty, but he did not become one of the Three. David put him in charge of his bodyguard.  (26)  The fighting men were: Joab’s brother Asahel, Elhanan son of Dodo of Bethlehem,  (27)  Shammoth the Harorite, Helez the Pelonite,  (28)  Ira son of Ikkesh the Tekoite, Abiezer the Anathothite,  (29)  Sibbecai the Hushathite, Ilai the Ahohite,  (30)  Maharai the Netophathite, Heled son of Baanah the Netophathite,  (31)  Ithai son of Ribai from Gibeah of the Benjaminites, Benaiah the Pirathonite,  (32)  Hurai from the wadis of Gaash, Abiel the Arbathite,  (33)  Azmaveth the Baharumite, Eliahba the Shaalbonite,  (34)  the sons of Hashem the Gizonite, Jonathan son of Shagee the Hararite,  (35)  Ahiam son of Sachar the Hararite, Eliphal son of Ur,  (36)  Hepher the Mecherathite, Ahijah the Pelonite,  (37)  Hezro the Carmelite, Naarai son of Ezbai,  (38)  Joel the brother of Nathan, Mibhar son of Hagri,  (39)  Zelek the Ammonite, Naharai the Beerothite, the armor-bearer for Joab son of Zeruiah,  (40)  Ira the Ithrite, Gareb the Ithrite,  (41)  Uriah the Hittite, Zabad son of Ahlai,  (42)  Adina son of Shiza the Reubenite, chief of the Reubenites, and 30 with him,  (43)  Hanan son of Maacah, Joshaphat the Mithnite,  (44)  Uzzia the Ashterathite, Shama and Jeiel the sons of Hotham the Aroerite,  (45)  Jediael son of Shimri and his brother Joha the Tizite,  (46)  Eliel the Mahavite, Jeribai and Joshaviah, the sons of Elnaam, Ithmah the Moabite,  (47)  Eliel, Obed, and Jaasiel the Mezobaite.”

1 Chronicles 12:1-40,

The Mighty Men join David

“(1) The following were the men who came to David at Ziklag while he was still banned from the presence of Saul son of Kish. They were among the warriors who helped him in battle.  (2)  They were archers who, using either their right or left hand, could throw stones with a sling or shoot arrows with a bow. They were Saul’s relatives from Benjamin:  (3)  Their chief was Ahiezer son of Shemaah the Gibeathite.Then there was his brother Joash;Jeziel and Pelet sons of Azmaveth;Beracah, Jehu the Anathothite;  (4)  Ishmaiah the Gibeonite, a warrior among the Thirty and a leader over the Thirty; Jeremiah, Jahaziel, Johanan, Jozabad the Gederathite;  (5)  Eluzai, Jerimoth, Bealiah, Shemariah, Shephatiah the Haruphite;  (6)  Elkanah, Isshiah, Azarel, Joezer, and Jashobeam, the Korahites;  (7)  and Joelah and Zebadiah, the sons of Jeroham from Gedor.  (8)  Some Gadites defected to David at his stronghold in the desert. They were fighting men, trained for battle, expert with shield and spear. Their faces were like the faces of lions, and they were as swift as gazelles on the mountains.  (9)  Ezer was the chief, Obadiah second, Eliab third,  (10)  Mishmannah fourth, Jeremiah fifth,  (11)  Attai sixth, Eliel seventh,  (12)  Johanan eighth, Elzabad ninth,  (13)  Jeremiah tenth, and Machbannai eleventh.  (14)  These Gadites were army commanders; the least of them was a match for a hundred, and the greatest of them for a thousand.  (15)  These are the men who crossed the Jordan in the first month when it was overflowing all its banks, and put to flight all those in the valleys to the east and to the west.  (16)  Other Benjaminites and men from Judah also went to David at the stronghold.  (17)  David went out to meet them and said to them, “If you have come in peace to help me, my heart will be united with you, but if you have come to betray me to my enemies even though my hands have done no wrong, may the God of our ancestors look on it and judge.”  (18)  Then the Spirit took control of Amasai, chief of the Thirty, and he said: We are yours, David, we are with you, son of Jesse! Peace, peace to you, and peace to him who helps you, for your God helps you. So David received them and made them leaders of his troops.  (19)  Some Manassites defected to David when he went with the Philistines to fight against Saul. However, they did not help the Philistines because the Philistine rulers, following consultation, sent David away. They said, “It will be our heads if he defects to his master Saul.”  (20)  When David went to Ziklag, some men from Manasseh defected to him: Adnah, Jozabad, Jediael, Michael, Jozabad, Elihu, and Zillethai, chiefs of thousands in Manasseh.  (21)  They helped David against the marauders, for they were all brave warriors and commanders in the army.  (22)  At that time, men came day after day to help David until there was a great army, like an army of God.  (23)  The numbers of the armed troops who came to David at Hebron to turn Saul’s kingdom over to him, according to the LORD’s word, were as follows:  (24)  From the Judahites: 6,800 armed troops bearing shields and spears.  (25)  From the Simeonites: 7,100 brave warriors ready for war.  (26)  From the Levites: 4,600  (27)  in addition to Jehoiada, leader of the house of Aaron, with 3,700 men;  (28)  and Zadok, a young brave warrior, with 22 commanders from his own ancestral house.  (29)  From the Benjaminites, the relatives of Saul: 3,000 (up to that time the majority of the Benjaminites maintained their allegiance to the house of Saul).  (30)  From the Ephraimites: 20,800 brave warriors who were famous men in their ancestral houses.  (31)  From half the tribe of Manasseh: 18,000 designated by name to come and make David king.  (32)  From the Issacharites, who understood the times and knew what Israel should do: 200 chiefs with all their relatives under their command.  (33)  From Zebulun: 50,000 who could serve in the army, trained for battle with all kinds of weapons of war, with singleness of purpose to help David.  (34)  From Naphtali: 1,000 commanders accompanied by 37,000 men with shield and spear.  (35)  From the Danites: 28,600 trained for battle.  (36)  From Asher: 40,000 who could serve in the army, trained for battle.  (37)  From across the Jordan–from the Reubenites, Gadites, and half the tribe of Manasseh: 120,000 men equipped with all the military weapons of war.  (38)  All these warriors, lined up in battle formation, came to Hebron with wholehearted determination to make David king over all Israel. All the rest of Israel was also of one mind to make David king.  (39)  They were there with David for three days, eating and drinking, for their relatives had provided for them.  (40)  In addition, their neighbors from as far away as Issachar, Zebulun, and Naphtali came bringing food on donkeys, camels, mules, and oxen–abundant provisions of flour, fig cakes, raisins, wine and oil, oxen, and sheep. Indeed, there was joy in Israel.”

Blessings!

 

I hope this teaching will challenge you and encourage you to place your trust in the Lord Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord.

You have a special place in God’s family & kingdom. If you do not know Him, please use our ‘Contact Us‘ page and reach out so we may have the privilege of introducing you to the Lord. Neither money nor attendance at our church will be mentioned.

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Blessings!

Hi my name is Mark and though I am opposed to titles, I am currently the only Pastor (shepherd/elder) serving our assembly right now.

I have been Pastoring in one capacity or another for nearly 30 years now, though never quite like I am today.

Early in 2009 the Lord revealed to me that the way we had structured our assembly (church) was not scriptural in that it was out of sync with what Paul modeled for us in the New Testament. In truth, I (like many pastors I am sure) never even gave this fundamental issue of church structure the first thought. I had always assumed that church structure was largely the same everywhere and had been so from the beginning. While I knew Paul had some very stringent things to say about the local assembly of believers, the point of our gatherings together and who may or may not lead, I never even considered studying these issues but assumed we were all pretty much doing it right...safety in numbers right?! Boy, I couldn't have been more wrong!

So needless to say, my discovery that we had been doing it wrong for nearly two decades was a bit of a shock to me! Now, this "revelation" that did not come about all at once but over the course of a few weeks. We were a traditional single pastor led congregation. It was a top-bottom model of ministry which is in part biblical, but not in the form of a monarchy.

The needed change did not come into focus until following 9 very intense months of study and discussions with those who were leaders in our church at the time.

We now understand and believe that the Bible teaches co-leadership with equal authority in each local assembly. Having multiple shepherds with God's heart and equal authority protects both Shepherds and sheep. Equal accountability keep authority and doctrine in check. Multiple shepherds also provides teaching with various styles and giftings with leadership skills which are both different and complementary.

For a while we had two co-pastors (elders) (myself and one other man) who led the church with equal authority, but different giftings. We both taught in our own ways and styles, and our leadership skills were quite different, but complimentary. We were in complete submission to each other and worked side-by-side in the labor of shepherding the flock.

Our other Pastor has since moved on to other ministry which has left us with just myself. While we currently only have one Pastor/Elder, it is our desire that God, in His faithfulness and timing, may bring us more as we grow in maturity and even in numbers.

As to my home, I have been married since 1995 to my wonderful wife Terissa Woodson who is my closest friend and most trusted ally.

As far as my education goes, I grew up in a Christian home, but questioned everything I was ever taught.

I graduated from Bible college in 1990 and continued to question everything I was ever taught (I do not mention my college in order to avoid being labeled).

Perhaps my greatest preparation for ministry has been life and ministry itself. To quote an author I have come to enjoy namely Fredrick Buechner in his writing entitled, Now and Then, "If God speaks to us at all other than through such official channels as the Bible and the church, then I think that He speaks to us largely through what happens to us...if we keep our hearts open as well as our ears, if we listen with patience and hope, if we remember at all deeply and honestly, then I think we come to recognize beyond all doubt, that, however faintly we may hear Him, He is indeed speaking to us, and that, however little we may understand of it, His word to each of us is both recoverable and precious beyond telling." ~ Fredrick Buechner

Well that is about all there is of interest to tell you about me.

I hope our ministry here is a blessing to you and your family. I also hope that it is only a supplement to a local church where you are committed to other believers in a community of grace.

~God Bless!